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Cancer Screening: Communication and Awareness Campaigns

Categories:

  • Cancer screening,
  • Social environment,
  • Community,
  • Facilities & organizations,
  • Workplace,
  • Schools,
  • Healthcare facilities,

Create communication and awareness campaigns to promote cancer screening

How to implement

  • Plan and implement community awareness campaigns to promote cancer screening.1-4
    • Make use of 'small media' strategies, such as videos, letters, brochures and newsletters.
    • Work with community health providers (e.g., primary care nurses, doctor’s offices, health units) to deliver messages.
    • Spread the word through a variety of settings (e.g., community and healthcare).4

High impactProvide culturally-appropriate campaigns to increase cancer screening in minority groups and ethnic communities.5, 6 

Alberta Health Services' Screening for Life website has a range of cancer screening resources (e.g., pamphlets, posters and decision-making guides) on different topic areas:

Example in action: The Canadian Cancer Society initiated the Get Screened campaign for members of the LGBTQ community. The campaign includes a health provider training model, videos and downloadable materials.

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  1. Brouwers M, De Vito C, Carol A, Carroll J, Cotterchio M, Dobbins M, Lent B, Levitt C, Lewis N, McGregor SE, Paszat L, Rand C, Wathen N. Interventions to increase the uptake of cancer screening: guideline recommendations. Evidence-based series 15-7. Section 1. Toronto (ON): Cancer Care Ontario; 2009. Available from: https://www.bowelscreen.ie/_fileupload/Documents/Interventions%20to%20Increase%20the%20Uptake%20of%20Cancer%20Screening.pdf.
  2. Community Preventive Services Task Force, CDC. Increasing cancer screening: small media targeting clients. The community guide. Atlanta (GA): CDC; 2005. Available from: https://www.thecommunityguide.org/findings/cancer-screening-small-media-targeting-clients-breast-cancer. (Similar community guides are also available for cervical cancer and colorectal cancer.)
  3. Sabatino S, Lawrence B, Elder R, et al. Effectiveness of interventions to increase screening for breast, cervical and colorectal cancers. AM J PREV MED. 2012;43(1):97-118. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2012.04.009. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22704754.
  4. Community Preventive Services Task Force, CDC. What works - cancer screening. The community guide. Atlanta (GA): CDC; 2012. Available from: https://www.thecommunityguide.org/sites/default/files/assets/What-Works-Factsheet-CancerScreening.pdf.
  5. Han H, Kim J, Lee J, et al. Interventions that increase use of Pap tests among ethnic minority women: a meta‐analysis. PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY. 2011;20(4):341-351. doi: 10.1002/pon.1754. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3741532/.
  6. Zhu C. Cancer screening in Aboriginal communities: a promising practice review. Edmonton (AB): Alberta Health Services; 2012. Available from: https://www.albertahealthservices.ca/poph/hi-poph-aboriginal-health-review-2012.pdf.

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